infer, imply

 Imply means to suggest: "He implied that I was a fool." Infer means to deduce: "After three hours of waiting, we inferred that they weren’t coming." The condition of being able to make an inference is inferable.

Bryson’s dictionary for writers and editors. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • imply — infer, imply 1. The only point noted by Fowler (1926) was that the inflected forms of infer are inferred and inferring, and this is thankfully still true (but note inferable or inferrable, with one r or two, and inference with only one r). Fowler …   Modern English usage

  • infer — infer, imply 1. The only point noted by Fowler (1926) was that the inflected forms of infer are inferred and inferring, and this is thankfully still true (but note inferable or inferrable, with one r or two, and inference with only one r). Fowler …   Modern English usage

  • imply —  , infer  Imply means to suggest: He implied that I was a fool. Infer means to deduce: After three hours of waiting, we inferred that they weren’t coming …   Bryson’s dictionary for writers and editors

  • infer — verb inferred, inferring (T) to form an opinion that something is probably true because of other information that you already know: infer sth from: facts that can be inferred from archaeological data | infer that: It would be wrong to infer that… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • infer — in·fer /in fər/ vb in·ferred, in·fer·ring vt: to derive as a conclusion from facts or premises could infer acceptance of the offer from the offeree s response vi: to draw inferences in·fer·able also in·fer·ri·ble /in fər ə bəl/ adj …   Law dictionary

  • imply — im·ply /im plī/ vt im·plied, im·ply·ing 1: to recognize as existing by inference or necessary consequence esp. on legal or equitable grounds in ordinary circumstances...the law would imply that it was the duty of the hospital to use due care… …   Law dictionary

  • imply — (v.) late 14c., to enfold, enwrap, entangle (the classical Latin sense), from O.Fr. emplier, from L. implicare involve (see IMPLICATE (Cf. implicate)). Meaning to involve something unstated as a logical consequence first recorded c.1400; that of… …   Etymology dictionary

  • infer — ► VERB (inferred, inferring) ▪ deduce from evidence and reasoning rather than from explicit statements. DERIVATIVES inferable (also inferrable) adjective. USAGE On the use of imply and infer, see the note at …   English terms dictionary

  • imply - infer — ◊ imply If you imply that something is the case, you suggest that it is the case without actually saying so. Somehow he implied that he was the one who had done all the work. His tone implied that he hoped that something would happen soon. ◊… …   Useful english dictionary

  • imply — ► VERB (implies, implied) 1) indicate by suggestion rather than explicit reference. 2) (of a fact or occurrence) suggest as a logical consequence. USAGE The words imply and infer do not mean the same thing. Imply is used with a speaker as its… …   English terms dictionary

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